Remembering Fallen Heroes

Remembering Fallen Heroes

“These fallen heroes represent the character of a nation who has a long history of patriotism and honor- and a nation who has fought many battles to keep our country free from threats of terror”. Michael Castle

As we enter Memorial Day weekend I am hearing lots of excitement about barbeques and the unofficial time of summer kicking off. For me Memorial Day has a different meaning. It reminds me of the time I served in Iraq and the things I experienced. It reminds me of fellow brothers and sisters that did not come back home with me. They gave their ultimate sacrifice for their country. Memorial Day is a reminder to be thankful to those who gave their life, served, and are still serving to keep us safe here at home. I am thankful that I made it back alive, and I will never forget those who didn’t make it home with me. This Memorial Day take a moment and reflect on the brave sacrifices of those who gave their life for this great nation because remembering fallen heroes is what Memorial Day is really about.

Happy Memorial Day!!!

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Memorial Day is more than just a day to hang out with family and friends eating barbeque at the lake. Oh and let’s not forget the spectacular fireworks lightening up the skies all over the USA. Today, we celebrate Memorial Day on the last Monday in May. On this day, we remember military individuals who have made the ultimate sacrifice during active military service. History 101, did you know when Memorial Day originally started (then called Decoration Day) it was specifically to honor the fallen soldiers of the Civil War? This was done in remembrance of all the fallen Union and Confederate soldiers, who sadly are buried all over the USA. “The first state to officially recognize the holiday was New York in 1873. By 1890 it was recognized by all of the northern states. The South refused to acknowledge the day, honoring their dead on separate days until after World War I (when the holiday changed from honoring just those who died fighting in the Civil War to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war).”  (Joshua Claybourn, www.usmemorialday.org).

I would like to thank all of the armed force individuals past and present (especially my sister) for their amazing, selfless acts to keep this great land of ours safe. Happy Memorial Day!!!

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

2014 veterans day va poster

We are republishing this post on PTSD.  We have the privilege of having two veterans on our staff.  Ms. Vernesa Perry and Mr. Timothy Cox.  Thank You for your service.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Personal accounts concerning traumatic events showed that those with post-traumatic stress disorder recurrently re-experience the traumatic incident; evade others, situations, or thoughts connected with the incident; and have symptoms of undue emotions (Baldwin, 2011). A traumatic experience is a life threatening incident such as a natural catastrophe, military warfare, serious accidents, terrorist incidents, or sexual or physical assault in childhood life or adult life. Some of survivors of traumatic events sometimes return to ordinary activities within little time. On the other hand, some individuals may have stress reactions that do not go away on their own, which might even get worse after a while. As a matter of fact, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric diagnosis that is familiar amongst those who have lived through horrendous events; the central diagnostic characteristics are memory distortions (Nader, 2010).

Traumatic experiences may entail a single incident, or a continuing or repetitive incident or incidents that may fully devastate someone’s capability to handle certain feelings involved with that event. Traumatic events and tragedies can happen unintentionally, intentionally, naturally, or be repeated several times. Each one of these tragedies are either a single or long-term occurrence, and it may be psychologically, physically, and emotionally overwhelming.  However, different individuals will respond in a different way to the same tragedies. One individual might believe an event to be distressing while another individual may not go through trauma as a consequence of the same tragedy. In other words, not everyone who goes through or witness a traumatic incident will turn out to be traumatized psychologically.

Treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder might help alleviate symptoms by helping you to handle the traumatic event you have gone through. Instead of evading the event and any memories of it, you are encouraged in treatment to recollect and deal with the sensations and emotions you experienced at the time of the initial event. On top of offering an exit for emotions you have been bottling up, treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder will furthermore aid in restoring your feelings of self-control and decrease the authoritative grasp your memory has on your life.

Cognitive behavioral therapy is a type of psychotherapeutic treatment that helps people understand their feelings and thoughts that influence their behavior.  Cognitive behavioral therapy can consist of:

* Exposure therapy – Helps people face and control their fear. It exposes them to the trauma that they experienced in a safe way.

* Cognitive restructuring – Helps people make sense of the terrible memories. Sometimes people remember events in a different way than how they really happened. They might feel shameful or guilty about what is not their fault.

* Stress inoculation training – Reduces PTSD symptoms by teaching a person how to reduce their anxiety.

 It may be very hard to take that first step to help yourself. It is important to realize that although it may take some time, with treatment, you can get better.

“Be healed, be delivered, and be set free.”

LaTrina graduated in 2009 from American InterContinental University with a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with a concentration in forensics. In 2011 she earned her Masters of Arts degree in Forensic Psychology, as well as a certificate in Applied Forensics from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

In honor of our veteran’s our post today is about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Personal accounts concerning traumatic events showed that those with post-traumatic stress disorder recurrently re-experience the traumatic incident; evade others, situations, or thoughts connected with the incident; and have symptoms of undue emotions (Baldwin, 2011). A traumatic experience is a life threatening incident such as a natural catastrophe, military warfare, serious accidents, terrorist incidents, or sexual or physical assault in childhood life or adult life. Some of survivors of traumatic events sometimes return to ordinary activities within little time. On the other hand, some individuals may have stress reactions that do not go away on their own, which might even get worse after a while. As a matter of fact, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric diagnosis that is familiar amongst those who have lived through horrendous events; the central diagnostic characteristics are memory distortions (Nader, 2010).

Traumatic experiences may entail a single incident, or a continuing or repetitive incident or incidents that may fully devastate someone’s capability to handle certain feelings involved with that event. Traumatic events and tragedies can happen unintentionally, intentionally, naturally, or be repeated several times. Each one of these tragedies are either a single or long-term occurrence, and it may be psychologically, physically, and emotionally overwhelming.  However, different individuals will respond in a different way to the same tragedies. One individual might believe an event to be distressing while another individual may not go through trauma as a consequence of the same tragedy. In other words, not everyone who goes through or witness a traumatic incident will turn out to be traumatized psychologically.

Treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder might help alleviate symptoms by helping you to handle the traumatic event you have gone through. Instead of evading the event and any memories of it, you are encouraged in treatment to recollect and deal with the sensations and emotions you experienced at the time of the initial event. On top of offering an exit for emotions you have been bottling up, treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder will furthermore aid in restoring your feelings of self-control and decrease the authoritative grasp your memory has on your life.

Cognitive behavioral therapy is a type of psychotherapeutic treatment that helps people understand their feelings and thoughts that influence their behavior.  Cognitive behavioral therapy can consist of:

* Exposure therapy – Helps people face and control their fear. It exposes them to the trauma that they experienced in a safe way.

* Cognitive restructuring – Helps people make sense of the terrible memories. Sometimes people remember events in a different way than how they really happened. They might feel shameful or guilty about what is not their fault.

* Stress inoculation training – Reduces PTSD symptoms by teaching a person how to reduce their anxiety.

 It may be very hard to take that first step to help yourself. It is important to realize that although it may take some time, with treatment, you can get better.

“Be healed, be delivered, and be set free.”

Latrina Majors

LaTrina graduated in 2009 from American InterContinental University with a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with a concentration in forensics. In 2011 she earned her Masters of Arts degree in Forensic Psychology, as well as a certificate in Applied Forensics from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.